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Syracuse in the Boeheim Era

[Preface]
This past summer, I put together a table illustrating Syracuse's pythagorean record under Paul Pasqualoni's watch. In that spirit, what follows is Syracuse's pythagorean record in the Jim Boeheim era.

Now, there are a few caveats that should be understood before glancing at the table below. First, the pythagorean model that I used for this essay is different than the pythagorean model used by Ken Pomeroy. Pomeroy combines offensive efficiency and defensive efficiency to created an adjusted pythagorean winning percentage. I, on the other hand, have only included raw data below. Eventually, I will apply Pomeroy's adjusted method to the Boeheim Era, but for now, I'm sticking to a bare bones approach.

Next, the pythagorean winning percentage works best when applied to conference schedules. When used in that fashion, it is easier to determine which teams over and underachieved because there is a consistency in opponents. However, since I have yet to run across any conference-only data from pre-1994 showing Syracuse's offensive and defensive output, it was impossible to use the method in the aforementioned way. Thus, the pythagorean values are naturally a little skewed.

Furthermore, when this model is not applied to conference-only statistics, variables tend to become a little more chaotic. Looking at Syracuse is an excellent example of this because, for as long as I can remember, the Orange has played a slew of cupcakes to open their basketball seasons. Thus, all those blowouts have inflated the points for values and deflated the points against values. That is partially why Jim Boeheim has registered so many "underachieving" seasons according to the pythagorean model.

When I eventually get around to using efficiency values instead of points scored and points yielded values, the static should subside signficantly.

[Methodology]

Expected Winning Percentage = [Points Scored^10]/([Points Scored^10] + [Points Yielded^10])

[Data]

Pythagorean Model: 1976 - 2005
YearPFPAAW%PW% DIF
'76-'7726082107.867.894-.027
'77-'7824592004.786.886-.100
'78-'7926602145.867.896-.029
'79-'8025752116.867.877-.010
'80-'8126302440.647.679-.032
'81-'8222962197.552.608-.056
'82-'8326122311.719.773-.054
'83-'8425122311.719.697.022
'84-'8522632104.710.674.036
'85-'8626742184.813.883-.070
'86-'8731452766.816.783.033
'87-'8829652466.743.863-.120
'88-'8934102891.789.839-.050
'89-'9027212349.818.813.005
'90-'9126812380.813.767.046
'91-'9223832259.688.631.057
'92-'9323032139.633.677-.044
'93-'9425172248.767.756.011
'94-'9524712202.667.760-.093
'95-'9628972607.763.742.021
'96-'9723972208.594.695-.101
'97-'9824812345.743.637.106
'98-'9923872086.636.794-.158
'99-'0024002033.813.840-.027
'00-'0124752294.735.681.054
'01-'0226032404.639.689-.050
'02-'0327852435.857.793.064
'03-'0422652096.742.685.057
'04-'0525482197.794.815-.021
Legend:
PF = Points for
PA = Points yielded
AW% = Actual winning percentage
PW% = Pythagorean winning percentage
DIF = Difference between actual and pythagorean winning percentage

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